The king of all exercises

11.01.2016

Research shows that people at risk of lifestyle diseases can reduce the risk by 25 percent after just 20 workouts focusing on strength. It contributes to weight loss, prevents falls and osteoporosis. Additionally, strength training can even prevent cardiovascular disease, stroke, mental illness and substance abuse.

But what strength exercise is the absolute best?

The king of all exercises

One of the most important body parts to work on is your legs. They get the biggest impact throughout the day and need to be strong to keep you upright throughout life.

There are many good exercises for your legs, but there are none that are quite as good as squats or leg press. It has been proven through research that if you combine these exercises with effective endurance training, you´re chances for living a long and healthy life is good.

The rest of your life

Exercise is perishable. Three weeks of inactivity equals 30 years of aging.

There are unfortunately no shortcuts to good health and a strong body, and you have to work out regularly to obtain the health effects. However, it does not require more than two hours a week to maintain a good health the rest of your life.

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Squat til you drop

Squat is said to be the best exercise for your legs, and in the following text and video you get a brief introduction on how to conduct this exercise.

To get the best health effect of your training, the resistance should be so heavy that you don´t manage more than four repetitions in four sets.

How to:

Squat down to 90 degrees in the knee joint, have a short stop and attempt to move the weights rapidly up again. Add 5 kg each time you manage to carry out four times four repetitions.

Strength and endurance training can be combined, and intervals provide a good warm up before the strength session.

 

 

Sources:

Maximal strength training improves work economy, rate of force development and maximal strength morethan Conventional strength training 2012

Dallas Bed Rest and Training Study 2001